Legal Document Assistants

Blogs

LOCAL EVICTION SERVICES

Call Us: (916) 620-2446

STARTING THE EVICTION PROCESS

STEP 1 – 3

1. Complete the intake form online or download and return.

2. Submit payment online or by phone.

3. Electronically sign the forms we prepare.

DURING THE EVICTION PROCESS

Once Eviction Notice Expires, Skip To Step 3.

STEP 1 – 10

1. Electronically sign the prepared Notice.

2. We serve the tenant (s).

3. Once the notice expires, contact us to proceed with the Eviction process.

4. Electronically sign the court forms we prepare.

5. We file the forms with the court.

6. We serve the Defendant (s).

7. Once we serve the Defendant we inform you exactly how many days they have to Respond.

8. If the Defendant doesn’t Respond, we request for Entry of Default Judgement.

9. If the Defendant Responds, we Request to Set for Trial.

10. We deliver the writ to the Sheriff’s Department and schedule the lockout.

Please Allow 1-2 Business Days To Prepare And Serve Court Forms.

RENTAL INCREASE LAW CALIFORNIA

 

SEC. 3. Section 1947.12 is added to the Civil Code, to read:

1947.12. (a) (1) Subject to subdivision (b), an owner of residential real property shall not, over the course of any 12-month period, increase the gross rental rate for a dwelling or a unit more than 5 percent plus the percentage change in the cost of living, or 10 percent, whichever is lower, of the lowest gross rental rate charged for that dwelling or unit at any time during the 12 months prior to the effective date of the increase. In determining the lowest gross rental amount pursuant to this section, any rent discounts, incentives, concessions, or credits offered by the owner of such unit of residential real property and accepted by the tenant shall be excluded. The gross per-month rental rate and any owner-offered discounts, incentives, concessions, or credits shall be separately listed and identified in the lease or rental agreement or any amendments to an existing lease or rental agreement.
(2) If the same tenant remains in occupancy of a unit of residential real property over any 12-month period, the gross rental rate for the unit of residential real property shall not be increased in more than two increments over that 12-month period, subject to the other restrictions of this subdivision governing gross rental rate increase.
(b) For a new tenancy in which no tenant from the prior tenancy remains in lawful possession of the residential real property, the owner may establish the initial rental rate not subject to subdivision (a). Subdivision (a) is only applicable to subsequent increases after that initial rental rate has been established.
(c) A tenant of residential real property subject to this section shall not enter into a sublease that results in a total rent for the premises that exceeds the allowable rental rate authorized by subdivision (a). Nothing in this subdivision authorizes a tenant to sublet or assign the tenant’s interest where otherwise prohibited.
(d) This section shall not apply to the following residential real properties:
(1) Housing restricted by deed, regulatory restriction contained in an agreement with a government agency, or other recorded document as affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income, as defined in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code, or subject to an agreement that provides housing subsidies for affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income, as defined in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code or comparable federal statutes.
(2) Dormitories constructed and maintained in connection with any higher education institution within the state for use and occupancy by students in attendance at the institution.
(3) Housing subject to rent or price control through a public entity’s valid exercise of its police power consistent with Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 1954.50) that restricts annual increases in the rental rate to an amount less than that provided in subdivision (a).
(4) Housing that has been issued a certificate of occupancy within the previous 15 years.
(5) Residential real property that is alienable separate from the title to any other dwelling unit, provided that both of the following apply:
(A) The owner is not any of the following:
(i) A real estate investment trust, as defined in Section 856 of the Internal Revenue Code.
(ii) A corporation.
(iii) A limited liability company in which at least one member is a corporation.
(B) (i) The tenants have been provided written notice that the residential real property is exempt from this section using the following statement:

“This property is not subject to the rent limits imposed by Section 1947.12 of the Civil Code and is not subject to the just cause requirements of Section 1946.2 of the Civil Code. This property meets the requirements of Sections 1947.12 (c)(5) and 1946.2 (e)(7) of the Civil Code and the owner is not any of the following: (1) a real estate investment trust, as defined by Section 856 of the Internal Revenue Code; (2) a corporation; or (3) a limited liability company in which at least one member is a corporation.”

(ii) For a tenancy existing before July 1, 2020, the notice required under clause (i) may, but is not required to, be provided in the rental agreement.
(iii) For a tenancy commenced or renewed on or after July 1, 2020, the notice required under clause (i) must be provided in the rental agreement.
(iv) Addition of a provision containing the notice required under clause (i) to any new or renewed rental agreement or fixed-term lease constitutes a similar provision for the purposes of subparagraph (E) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 1946.2.
(6) A duplex in which the owner occupied one of the units as the owner’s principal place of residence at the beginning of the tenancy, so long as the owner continues in occupancy.
(e) An owner shall provide notice of any increase in the rental rate, pursuant to subdivision (a), to each tenant in accordance with Section 827.
(f) (1) On or before January 1, 2030, the Legislative Analyst’s Office shall report to the Legislature regarding the effectiveness of this section and Section 1947.13. The report shall include, but not be limited to, the impact of the rental rate cap pursuant to subdivision (a) on the housing market within the state.
(2) The report required by paragraph (1) shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code.
(g) For the purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) “Owner” and “residential real property” shall have the same meaning as those terms are defined in Section 1954.51.
(2) “Percentage change in the cost of living” means the percentage change from April 1 of the prior year to April 1 of the current year in the regional Consumer Price Index for the region where the residential real property is located, as published by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. If a regional index is not available, the California Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers for all items, as determined by the Department of Industrial Relations, shall apply.
(3) “Tenancy” means the lawful occupation of residential real property and includes a lease or sublease.
(h) (1) This section shall apply to all rent increases subject to subdivision (a) occurring on or after March 15, 2019. This section shall become operative January 1, 2020.
(2) In the event that an owner has increased the rent by more than the amount permissible under subdivision (a) between March 15, 2019, and January 1, 2020, both of the following shall apply:
(A) The applicable rent on January 1, 2020, shall be the rent as of March 15, 2019, plus the maximum permissible increase under subdivision (a).
(B) An owner shall not be liable to the tenant for any corresponding rent overpayment.
(3) An owner of residential real property subject to subdivision (a) who increased the rental rate on that residential real property on or after March 15, 2019, but prior to January 1, 2020, by an amount less than the rental rate increase permitted by subdivision (a) shall be allowed to increase the rental rate twice, as provided in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a), within 12 months of March 15, 2019, but in no event shall that rental rate increase exceed the maximum rental rate increase permitted by subdivision (a).
(i) Any waiver of the rights under this section shall be void as contrary to public policy.
(j) This section shall remain in effect until January 1, 2030, and as of that date is repealed.
(k) (1) The Legislature finds and declares that the unique circumstances of the current housing crisis require a statewide response to address rent gouging by establishing statewide limitations on gross rental rate increases.
(2) It is the intent of the Legislature that this section should apply only for the limited time needed to address the current statewide housing crisis, as described in paragraph (1). This section is not intended to expand or limit the authority of local governments to establish local policies regulating rents consistent with Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 1954.50), nor is it a statement regarding the appropriate, allowable rental rate increase when a local government adopts a policy regulating rent that is otherwise consistent with Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 1954.50).
(3) Nothing in this section authorizes a local government to establish limitations on any rental rate increases not otherwise permissible under Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 1954.50), or affects the existing authority of a local government to adopt or maintain rent controls or price controls consistent with that chapter.
SEC. 4. Section 1947.13 is added to the Civil Code, to read:

1947.13. (a) Notwithstanding Section 1947.12, upon the expiration of rental restrictions, the following shall apply:
(1) The owner of an assisted housing development who demonstrates, under penalty of perjury, compliance with all applicable provisions of Sections 65863.10, 65863.11, and 65863.13 of the Government Code and any other applicable law or regulation intended to promote the preservation of assisted housing, may establish the initial unassisted rental rate for units in the applicable housing development. Any subsequent rent increase in the development shall be subject to Section 1947.12.
(2) The owner of a deed-restricted affordable housing unit or an affordable housing unit subject to a regulatory restriction contained in an agreement with a government agency limiting rental rates that is not within an assisted housing development may establish the initial rental rate for the unit upon the expiration of the restriction. Any subsequent rent increase for the unit shall be subject to Section 1947.12.
(b) For purposes of this section:
(1) “Assisted housing development” has the same meaning as defined in paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 65863.10 of the Government Code.
(2) “Expiration of rental restrictions” has the same meaning as defined in paragraph (5) of subdivision (a) of Section 65863.10 of the Government Code.
(c) This section shall remain in effect until January 1, 2030, and as of that date is repealed.
(d) Any waiver of the rights under this section shall be void as contrary to public policy.
SEC. 5. No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution because the only costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district will be incurred because this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.

NO FAULT JUST CAUSE FOR EVICTION

(2) No-fault just cause, which includes any of the following:
(A) (i) Intent to occupy the residential real property by the owner or their spouse, domestic partner, children, grandchildren, parents, or grandparents.
(ii) For leases entered into on or after July 1, 2020, clause (i) shall apply only if the tenant agrees, in writing, to the termination, or if a provision of the lease allows the owner to terminate the lease if the owner, or their spouse, domestic partner, children, grandchildren, parents, or grandparents, unilaterally decides to occupy the residential real property. Addition of a provision allowing the owner to terminate the lease as described in this clause to a new or renewed rental agreement or fixed-term lease constitutes a similar provision for the purposes of subparagraph (E) of paragraph (1).
(B) Withdrawal of the residential real property from the rental market.
(C) (i) The owner complying with any of the following:
(I) An order issued by a government agency or court relating to habitability that necessitates vacating the residential real property.
(II) An order issued by a government agency or court to vacate the residential real property.
(III) A local ordinance that necessitates vacating the residential real property.
(ii) If it is determined by any government agency or court that the tenant is at fault for the condition or conditions triggering the order or need to vacate under clause (i), the tenant shall not be entitled to relocation assistance as outlined in paragraph (3) of subdivision (d).
(D) (i) Intent to demolish or to substantially remodel the residential real property.
(ii) For purposes of this subparagraph, “substantially remodel” means the replacement or substantial modification of any structural, electrical, plumbing, or mechanical system that requires a permit from a governmental agency, or the abatement of hazardous materials, including lead-based paint, mold, or asbestos, in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local laws, that cannot be reasonably accomplished in a safe manner with the tenant in place and that requires the tenant to vacate the residential real property for at least 30 days. Cosmetic improvements alone, including painting, decorating, and minor repairs, or other work that can be performed safely without having the residential real property vacated, do not qualify as substantial rehabilitation.
(c) Before an owner of residential real property issues a notice to terminate a tenancy for just cause that is a curable lease violation, the owner shall first give notice of the violation to the tenant with an opportunity to cure the violation pursuant to paragraph (3) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure. If the violation is not cured within the time period set forth in the notice, a three-day notice to quit without an opportunity to cure may thereafter be served to terminate the tenancy.
(d) (1) For a tenancy for which just cause is required to terminate the tenancy under subdivision (a), if an owner of residential real property issues a termination notice based on a no-fault just cause described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), the owner shall, regardless of the tenant’s income, at the owner’s option, do one of the following:
(A) Assist the tenant to relocate by providing a direct payment to the tenant as described in paragraph (3).
(B) Waive in writing the payment of rent for the final month of the tenancy, prior to the rent becoming due.
(2) If an owner issues a notice to terminate a tenancy for no-fault just cause, the owner shall notify the tenant of the tenant’s right to relocation assistance or rent waiver pursuant to this section. If the owner elects to waive the rent for the final month of the tenancy as provided in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1), the notice shall state the amount of rent waived and that no rent is due for the final month of the tenancy.
(3) (A) The amount of relocation assistance or rent waiver shall be equal to one month of the tenant’s rent that was in effect when the owner issued the notice to terminate the tenancy. Any relocation assistance shall be provided within 15 calendar days of service of the notice.
(B) If a tenant fails to vacate after the expiration of the notice to terminate the tenancy, the actual amount of any relocation assistance or rent waiver provided pursuant to this subdivision shall be recoverable as damages in an action to recover possession.
(C) The relocation assistance or rent waiver required by this subdivision shall be credited against any other relocation assistance required by any other law.
(4) An owner’s failure to strictly comply with this subdivision shall render the notice of termination void.
(e) This section shall not apply to the following types of residential real properties or residential circumstances:
(1) Transient and tourist hotel occupancy as defined in subdivision (b) of Section 1940.
(2) Housing accommodations in a nonprofit hospital, religious facility, extended care facility, licensed residential care facility for the elderly, as defined in Section 1569.2 of the Health and Safety Code, or an adult residential facility, as defined in Chapter 6 of Division 6 of Title 22 of the Manual of Policies and Procedures published by the State Department of Social Services.
(3) Dormitories owned and operated by an institution of higher education or a kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, school.
(4) Housing accommodations in which the tenant shares bathroom or kitchen facilities with the owner who maintains their principal residence at the residential real property.
(5) Single-family owner-occupied residences, including a residence in which the owner-occupant rents or leases no more than two units or bedrooms, including, but not limited to, an accessory dwelling unit or a junior accessory dwelling unit.
(6) A duplex in which the owner occupied one of the units as the owner’s principal place of residence at the beginning of the tenancy, so long as the owner continues in occupancy.
(7) Housing that has been issued a certificate of occupancy within the previous 15 years.
(8) Residential real property that is alienable separate from the title to any other dwelling unit, provided that both of the following apply:
(A) The owner is not any of the following:
(i) A real estate investment trust, as defined in Section 856 of the Internal Revenue Code.
(ii) A corporation.
(iii) A limited liability company in which at least one member is a corporation.
(B) (i) The tenants have been provided written notice that the residential property is exempt from this section using the following statement:

“This property is not subject to the rent limits imposed by Section 1947.12 of the Civil Code and is not subject to the just cause requirements of Section 1946.2 of the Civil Code. This property meets the requirements of Sections 1947.12 (d)(5) and 1946.2 (e)(8) of the Civil Code and the owner is not any of the following: (1) a real estate investment trust, as defined by Section 856 of the Internal Revenue Code; (2) a corporation; or (3) a limited liability company in which at least one member is a corporation.”

(ii) For a tenancy existing before July 1, 2020, the notice required under clause (i) may, but is not required to, be provided in the rental agreement.
(iii) For any tenancy commenced or renewed on or after July 1, 2020, the notice required under clause (i) must be provided in the rental agreement.
(iv) Addition of a provision containing the notice required under clause (i) to any new or renewed rental agreement or fixed-term lease constitutes a similar provision for the purposes of subparagraph (E) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (b).
(9) Housing restricted by deed, regulatory restriction contained in an agreement with a government agency, or other recorded document as affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income, as defined in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code, or subject to an agreement that provides housing subsidies for affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income, as defined in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code or comparable federal statutes.
(f) An owner of residential real property subject to this section shall provide notice to the tenant as follows:
(1) For any tenancy commenced or renewed on or after July 1, 2020, as an addendum to the lease or rental agreement, or as a written notice signed by the tenant, with a copy provided to the tenant.
(2) For a tenancy existing prior to July 1, 2020, by written notice to the tenant no later than August 1, 2020, or as an addendum to the lease or rental agreement.
(3) The notification or lease provision shall be in no less than 12-point type, and shall include the following:

“California law limits the amount your rent can be increased. See Section 1947.12 of the Civil Code for more information. California law also provides that after all of the tenants have continuously and lawfully occupied the property for 12 months or more or at least one of the tenants has continuously and lawfully occupied the property for 24 months or more, a landlord must provide a statement of cause in any notice to terminate a tenancy. See Section 1946.2 of the Civil Code for more information.”

The provision of the notice shall be subject to Section 1632.
(g) (1) This section does not apply to the following residential real property:
(A) Residential real property subject to a local ordinance requiring just cause for termination of a residential tenancy adopted on or before September 1, 2019, in which case the local ordinance shall apply.
(B) Residential real property subject to a local ordinance requiring just cause for termination of a residential tenancy adopted or amended after September 1, 2019, that is more protective than this section, in which case the local ordinance shall apply. For purposes of this subparagraph, an ordinance is “more protective” if it meets all of the following criteria:
(i) The just cause for termination of a residential tenancy under the local ordinance is consistent with this section.
(ii) The ordinance further limits the reasons for termination of a residential tenancy, provides for higher relocation assistance amounts, or provides additional tenant protections that are not prohibited by any other provision of law.
(iii) The local government has made a binding finding within their local ordinance that the ordinance is more protective than the provisions of this section.
(2) A residential real property shall not be subject to both a local ordinance requiring just cause for termination of a residential tenancy and this section.
(3) A local ordinance adopted after September 1, 2019, that is less protective than this section shall not be enforced unless this section is repealed.
(h) Any waiver of the rights under this section shall be void as contrary to public policy.
(i) For the purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) “Owner” and “residential real property” have the same meaning as those terms are defined in Section 1954.51.
(2) “Tenancy” means the lawful occupation of residential real property and includes a lease or sublease.
(j) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2030, and as of that date is repealed.

WHAT IS JUST CAUSE FOR EVICTION

1946.2.

(a) Notwithstanding any other law, after a tenant has continuously and lawfully occupied a residential real property for 12 months, the owner of the residential real property shall not terminate the tenancy without just cause, which shall be stated in the written notice to terminate tenancy. If any additional adult tenants are added to the lease before an existing tenant has continuously and lawfully occupied the residential real property for 24 months, then this subdivision shall only apply if either of the following are satisfied:

(1) All of the tenants have continuously and lawfully occupied the residential real property for 12 months or more.
(2) One or more tenants have continuously and lawfully occupied the residential real property for 24 months or more.
(b) For purposes of this section, “just cause” includes either of the following:
(1) At-fault just cause, which is any of the following:
(A) Default in the payment of rent.
(B) A breach of a material term of the lease, as described in paragraph (3) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure, including, but not limited to, violation of a provision of the lease after being issued a written notice to correct the violation.
(C) Maintaining, committing, or permitting the maintenance or commission of a nuisance as described in paragraph (4) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(D) Committing waste as described in paragraph (4) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(E) The tenant had a written lease that terminated on or after January 1, 2020, and after a written request or demand from the owner, the tenant has refused to execute a written extension or renewal of the lease for an additional term of similar duration with similar provisions, provided that those terms do not violate this section or any other provision of law.
(F) Criminal activity by the tenant on the residential real property, including any common areas, or any criminal activity or criminal threat, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 422 of the Penal Code, on or off the residential real property, that is directed at any owner or agent of the owner of the residential real property.
(G) Assigning or subletting the premises in violation of the tenant’s lease, as described in paragraph (4) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(H) The tenant’s refusal to allow the owner to enter the residential real property as authorized by Sections 1101.5 and 1954 of this code, and Sections 13113.7 and 17926.1 of the Health and Safety Code.
(I) Using the premises for an unlawful purpose as described in paragraph (4) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(J) The employee, agent, or licensee’s failure to vacate after their termination as an employee, agent, or a licensee as described in paragraph (1) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(K) When the tenant fails to deliver possession of the residential real property after providing the owner written notice as provided in Section 1946 of the tenant’s intention to terminate the hiring of the real property, or makes a written offer to surrender that is accepted in writing by the landlord, but fails to deliver possession at the time specified in that written notice as described in paragraph (5) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.

NEW EVICTION LAW CALIFORNIA “JUST CAUSE”

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST

AB 1482, Chiu. Tenant Protection Act of 2019: tenancy: rent caps.
Existing law specifies that a hiring of residential real property, for a term not specified by the parties, is deemed to be renewed at the end of the term implied by law unless one of the parties gives written notice to the other of that party’s intention to terminate. Existing law requires an owner of a residential dwelling to give notice at least 60 days prior to the proposed date of termination, or at least 30 days prior to the proposed date of termination if any tenant or resident has resided in the dwelling for less than one year, as specified. Existing law requires any notice given by an owner to be given in a prescribed manner, to contain certain information, and to be formatted, as specified.
This bill would, with certain exceptions, prohibit an owner, as defined, of residential real property from terminating a tenancy without just cause, as defined, which the bill would require to be stated in the written notice to terminate tenancy when the tenant has continuously and lawfully occupied the residential real property for 12 months, except as provided. The bill would require, for certain just cause terminations that are curable, that the owner give a notice of violation and an opportunity to cure the violation prior to issuing the notice of termination. The bill, if the violation is not cured within the time period set forth in the notice, would authorize a 3-day notice to quit without an opportunity to cure to be served to terminate the tenancy. The bill would require, for no-fault just cause terminations, as specified, that the owner, at the owner’s option, either assist certain tenants to relocate, regardless of the tenant’s income, by providing a direct payment of one month’s rent to the tenant, as specified, or waive in writing the payment of rent for the final month of the tenancy, prior to the rent becoming due. The bill would require the actual amount of relocation assistance or rent waiver provided to a tenant that fails to vacate after the expiration of the notice to terminate the tenancy to be recoverable as damages in an action to recover possession. The bill would provide that if the owner does not provide relocation assistance, the notice of termination is void. The bill would except certain properties and circumstances from the application of its provisions. The bill would require an owner of residential property to provide prescribed notice to a tenant of the tenant’s rights under these provisions. The bill would not apply to residential real property subject to a local ordinance requiring just cause for termination adopted on or before September 1, 2019, or to residential real property subject to a local ordinance requiring just cause for termination adopted or amended after September 1, 2019, that is more protective than these provisions, as defined. The bill would void any waiver of the rights under these provisions. The bill would repeal these provisions as of January 1, 2030.
Existing law governs the hiring of residential dwelling units and requires a landlord to provide specified notice to tenants prior to an increase in rent. Existing law, the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act, prescribes statewide limits on the application of local rent control with regard to certain properties. That act, among other things, authorizes an owner of residential real property to establish the initial and all subsequent rental rates for a dwelling or unit that meets specified criteria, subject to certain limitations.
This bill would, until January 1, 2030, prohibit an owner of residential real property from, over the course of any 12-month period, increasing the gross rental rate for a dwelling or unit more than 5% plus the percentage change in the cost of living, as defined, or 10%, whichever is lower, of the lowest gross rental rate charged for the immediately preceding 12 months, subject to specified conditions. The bill would prohibit an owner of a unit of residential real property from increasing the gross rental rate for the unit in more than 2 increments over a 12-month period, after the tenant remains in occupancy of the unit over a 12-month period. The bill would exempt certain properties from these provisions. The bill would require the Legislative Analyst’s Office to submit a report, on or before January 1, 2030, to the Legislature regarding the effectiveness of these provisions. The bill would provide that these provisions apply to all rent increases occurring on or after March 15, 2019. The bill would provide that in the event that an owner increased the rent by more than the amount specified above between March 15, 2019, and January 1, 2020, the applicable rent on January 1, 2020, shall be the rent as of March 15, 2019, plus the maximum permissible increase, and the owner shall not be liable to the tenant for any corresponding rent overpayment. The bill would authorize an owner who increased the rent by less than the amount specified above between March 15, 2019, and January 1, 2020, to increase the rent twice within 12 months of March 15, 2019, but not by more than the amount specified above. The bill would void any waiver of the rights under these provisions.
The Planning and Zoning Law requires the owner of an assisted housing development in which there will be an expiration of rental restrictions to, among other things, provide notice of the proposed change to each affected tenant household residing in the assisted housing development subject to specified procedures and requirements, and to also provide specified entities notice and an opportunity to submit an offer to purchase the development prior to the expiration of the rental restrictions.
This bill would authorize an owner of an assisted housing development, who demonstrates, under penalty of perjury, compliance with the provisions described above with regard to the expiration of rental restrictions, to establish the initial unassisted rental rate for units without regard to the cap on rent increases discussed above, but would require the owner to comply with the above cap on rent increases for subsequent rent increases in the development. The bill would authorize an owner of a deed-restricted affordable housing unit or an affordable housing unit subject to a regulatory restriction contained in an agreement with a government agency limiting rental rates that is not within an assisted housing development to establish the initial rental rate for the unit upon the expiration of the restriction, but would require the owner to comply with the above cap on rent increases for subsequent rent increases for the unit. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2030. The bill would void any waiver of the rights under these provisions. By requiring an owner of an assisted housing development to demonstrate compliance with specified provisions under penalty of perjury, this bill would expand the existing crime of perjury and thus would impose a state-mandated local program.
The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

Digest Key

Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: YES  


Bill Text

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:

SECTION 1.

This act shall be known, and may be cited, as the Tenant Protection Act of 2019.

SEC. 2.

Section 1946.2 is added to the Civil Code, to read:

1946.2.

(a) Notwithstanding any other law, after a tenant has continuously and lawfully occupied a residential real property for 12 months, the owner of the residential real property shall not terminate the tenancy without just cause, which shall be stated in the written notice to terminate tenancy. If any additional adult tenants are added to the lease before an existing tenant has continuously and lawfully occupied the residential real property for 24 months, then this subdivision shall only apply if either of the following are satisfied:

(1) All of the tenants have continuously and lawfully occupied the residential real property for 12 months or more.
(2) One or more tenants have continuously and lawfully occupied the residential real property for 24 months or more.
(b) For purposes of this section, “just cause” includes either of the following:
(1) At-fault just cause, which is any of the following:
(A) Default in the payment of rent.
(B) A breach of a material term of the lease, as described in paragraph (3) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure, including, but not limited to, violation of a provision of the lease after being issued a written notice to correct the violation.
(C) Maintaining, committing, or permitting the maintenance or commission of a nuisance as described in paragraph (4) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(D) Committing waste as described in paragraph (4) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(E) The tenant had a written lease that terminated on or after January 1, 2020, and after a written request or demand from the owner, the tenant has refused to execute a written extension or renewal of the lease for an additional term of similar duration with similar provisions, provided that those terms do not violate this section or any other provision of law.
(F) Criminal activity by the tenant on the residential real property, including any common areas, or any criminal activity or criminal threat, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 422 of the Penal Code, on or off the residential real property, that is directed at any owner or agent of the owner of the residential real property.
(G) Assigning or subletting the premises in violation of the tenant’s lease, as described in paragraph (4) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(H) The tenant’s refusal to allow the owner to enter the residential real property as authorized by Sections 1101.5 and 1954 of this code, and Sections 13113.7 and 17926.1 of the Health and Safety Code.
(I) Using the premises for an unlawful purpose as described in paragraph (4) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(J) The employee, agent, or licensee’s failure to vacate after their termination as an employee, agent, or a licensee as described in paragraph (1) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(K) When the tenant fails to deliver possession of the residential real property after providing the owner written notice as provided in Section 1946 of the tenant’s intention to terminate the hiring of the real property, or makes a written offer to surrender that is accepted in writing by the landlord, but fails to deliver possession at the time specified in that written notice as described in paragraph (5) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(2) No-fault just cause, which includes any of the following:
(A) (i) Intent to occupy the residential real property by the owner or their spouse, domestic partner, children, grandchildren, parents, or grandparents.
(ii) For leases entered into on or after July 1, 2020, clause (i) shall apply only if the tenant agrees, in writing, to the termination, or if a provision of the lease allows the owner to terminate the lease if the owner, or their spouse, domestic partner, children, grandchildren, parents, or grandparents, unilaterally decides to occupy the residential real property. Addition of a provision allowing the owner to terminate the lease as described in this clause to a new or renewed rental agreement or fixed-term lease constitutes a similar provision for the purposes of subparagraph (E) of paragraph (1).
(B) Withdrawal of the residential real property from the rental market.
(C) (i) The owner complying with any of the following:
(I) An order issued by a government agency or court relating to habitability that necessitates vacating the residential real property.
(II) An order issued by a government agency or court to vacate the residential real property.
(III) A local ordinance that necessitates vacating the residential real property.
(ii) If it is determined by any government agency or court that the tenant is at fault for the condition or conditions triggering the order or need to vacate under clause (i), the tenant shall not be entitled to relocation assistance as outlined in paragraph (3) of subdivision (d).
(D) (i) Intent to demolish or to substantially remodel the residential real property.
(ii) For purposes of this subparagraph, “substantially remodel” means the replacement or substantial modification of any structural, electrical, plumbing, or mechanical system that requires a permit from a governmental agency, or the abatement of hazardous materials, including lead-based paint, mold, or asbestos, in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local laws, that cannot be reasonably accomplished in a safe manner with the tenant in place and that requires the tenant to vacate the residential real property for at least 30 days. Cosmetic improvements alone, including painting, decorating, and minor repairs, or other work that can be performed safely without having the residential real property vacated, do not qualify as substantial rehabilitation.
(c) Before an owner of residential real property issues a notice to terminate a tenancy for just cause that is a curable lease violation, the owner shall first give notice of the violation to the tenant with an opportunity to cure the violation pursuant to paragraph (3) of Section 1161 of the Code of Civil Procedure. If the violation is not cured within the time period set forth in the notice, a three-day notice to quit without an opportunity to cure may thereafter be served to terminate the tenancy.
(d) (1) For a tenancy for which just cause is required to terminate the tenancy under subdivision (a), if an owner of residential real property issues a termination notice based on a no-fault just cause described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), the owner shall, regardless of the tenant’s income, at the owner’s option, do one of the following:
(A) Assist the tenant to relocate by providing a direct payment to the tenant as described in paragraph (3).
(B) Waive in writing the payment of rent for the final month of the tenancy, prior to the rent becoming due.
(2) If an owner issues a notice to terminate a tenancy for no-fault just cause, the owner shall notify the tenant of the tenant’s right to relocation assistance or rent waiver pursuant to this section. If the owner elects to waive the rent for the final month of the tenancy as provided in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1), the notice shall state the amount of rent waived and that no rent is due for the final month of the tenancy.
(3) (A) The amount of relocation assistance or rent waiver shall be equal to one month of the tenant’s rent that was in effect when the owner issued the notice to terminate the tenancy. Any relocation assistance shall be provided within 15 calendar days of service of the notice.
(B) If a tenant fails to vacate after the expiration of the notice to terminate the tenancy, the actual amount of any relocation assistance or rent waiver provided pursuant to this subdivision shall be recoverable as damages in an action to recover possession.
(C) The relocation assistance or rent waiver required by this subdivision shall be credited against any other relocation assistance required by any other law.
(4) An owner’s failure to strictly comply with this subdivision shall render the notice of termination void.
(e) This section shall not apply to the following types of residential real properties or residential circumstances:
(1) Transient and tourist hotel occupancy as defined in subdivision (b) of Section 1940.
(2) Housing accommodations in a nonprofit hospital, religious facility, extended care facility, licensed residential care facility for the elderly, as defined in Section 1569.2 of the Health and Safety Code, or an adult residential facility, as defined in Chapter 6 of Division 6 of Title 22 of the Manual of Policies and Procedures published by the State Department of Social Services.
(3) Dormitories owned and operated by an institution of higher education or a kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, school.
(4) Housing accommodations in which the tenant shares bathroom or kitchen facilities with the owner who maintains their principal residence at the residential real property.
(5) Single-family owner-occupied residences, including a residence in which the owner-occupant rents or leases no more than two units or bedrooms, including, but not limited to, an accessory dwelling unit or a junior accessory dwelling unit.
(6) A duplex in which the owner occupied one of the units as the owner’s principal place of residence at the beginning of the tenancy, so long as the owner continues in occupancy.
(7) Housing that has been issued a certificate of occupancy within the previous 15 years.
(8) Residential real property that is alienable separate from the title to any other dwelling unit, provided that both of the following apply:
(A) The owner is not any of the following:
(i) A real estate investment trust, as defined in Section 856 of the Internal Revenue Code.
(ii) A corporation.
(iii) A limited liability company in which at least one member is a corporation.
(B) (i) The tenants have been provided written notice that the residential property is exempt from this section using the following statement:

“This property is not subject to the rent limits imposed by Section 1947.12 of the Civil Code and is not subject to the just cause requirements of Section 1946.2 of the Civil Code. This property meets the requirements of Sections 1947.12 (d)(5) and 1946.2 (e)(8) of the Civil Code and the owner is not any of the following: (1) a real estate investment trust, as defined by Section 856 of the Internal Revenue Code; (2) a corporation; or (3) a limited liability company in which at least one member is a corporation.”

(ii) For a tenancy existing before July 1, 2020, the notice required under clause (i) may, but is not required to, be provided in the rental agreement.
(iii) For any tenancy commenced or renewed on or after July 1, 2020, the notice required under clause (i) must be provided in the rental agreement.
(iv) Addition of a provision containing the notice required under clause (i) to any new or renewed rental agreement or fixed-term lease constitutes a similar provision for the purposes of subparagraph (E) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (b).
(9) Housing restricted by deed, regulatory restriction contained in an agreement with a government agency, or other recorded document as affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income, as defined in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code, or subject to an agreement that provides housing subsidies for affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income, as defined in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code or comparable federal statutes.
(f) An owner of residential real property subject to this section shall provide notice to the tenant as follows:
(1) For any tenancy commenced or renewed on or after July 1, 2020, as an addendum to the lease or rental agreement, or as a written notice signed by the tenant, with a copy provided to the tenant.
(2) For a tenancy existing prior to July 1, 2020, by written notice to the tenant no later than August 1, 2020, or as an addendum to the lease or rental agreement.
(3) The notification or lease provision shall be in no less than 12-point type, and shall include the following:
“California law limits the amount your rent can be increased. See Section 1947.12 of the Civil Code for more information. California law also provides that after all of the tenants have continuously and lawfully occupied the property for 12 months or more or at least one of the tenants has continuously and lawfully occupied the property for 24 months or more, a landlord must provide a statement of cause in any notice to terminate a tenancy. See Section 1946.2 of the Civil Code for more information.”

The provision of the notice shall be subject to Section 1632.

(g) (1) This section does not apply to the following residential real property:
(A) Residential real property subject to a local ordinance requiring just cause for termination of a residential tenancy adopted on or before September 1, 2019, in which case the local ordinance shall apply.
(B) Residential real property subject to a local ordinance requiring just cause for termination of a residential tenancy adopted or amended after September 1, 2019, that is more protective than this section, in which case the local ordinance shall apply. For purposes of this subparagraph, an ordinance is “more protective” if it meets all of the following criteria:
(i) The just cause for termination of a residential tenancy under the local ordinance is consistent with this section.
(ii) The ordinance further limits the reasons for termination of a residential tenancy, provides for higher relocation assistance amounts, or provides additional tenant protections that are not prohibited by any other provision of law.
(iii) The local government has made a binding finding within their local ordinance that the ordinance is more protective than the provisions of this section.
(2) A residential real property shall not be subject to both a local ordinance requiring just cause for termination of a residential tenancy and this section.
(3) A local ordinance adopted after September 1, 2019, that is less protective than this section shall not be enforced unless this section is repealed.
(h) Any waiver of the rights under this section shall be void as contrary to public policy.
(i) For the purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) “Owner” and “residential real property” have the same meaning as those terms are defined in Section 1954.51.
(2) “Tenancy” means the lawful occupation of residential real property and includes a lease or sublease.
(j) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2030, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 3.

Section 1947.12 is added to the Civil Code, to read:

1947.12.

(a) (1) Subject to subdivision (b), an owner of residential real property shall not, over the course of any 12-month period, increase the gross rental rate for a dwelling or a unit more than 5 percent plus the percentage change in the cost of living, or 10 percent, whichever is lower, of the lowest gross rental rate charged for that dwelling or unit at any time during the 12 months prior to the effective date of the increase. In determining the lowest gross rental amount pursuant to this section, any rent discounts, incentives, concessions, or credits offered by the owner of such unit of residential real property and accepted by the tenant shall be excluded. The gross per-month rental rate and any owner-offered discounts, incentives, concessions, or credits shall be separately listed and identified in the lease or rental agreement or any amendments to an existing lease or rental agreement.

(2) If the same tenant remains in occupancy of a unit of residential real property over any 12-month period, the gross rental rate for the unit of residential real property shall not be increased in more than two increments over that 12-month period, subject to the other restrictions of this subdivision governing gross rental rate increase.
(b) For a new tenancy in which no tenant from the prior tenancy remains in lawful possession of the residential real property, the owner may establish the initial rental rate not subject to subdivision (a). Subdivision (a) is only applicable to subsequent increases after that initial rental rate has been established.
(c) A tenant of residential real property subject to this section shall not enter into a sublease that results in a total rent for the premises that exceeds the allowable rental rate authorized by subdivision (a). Nothing in this subdivision authorizes a tenant to sublet or assign the tenant’s interest where otherwise prohibited.
(d) This section shall not apply to the following residential real properties:
(1) Housing restricted by deed, regulatory restriction contained in an agreement with a government agency, or other recorded document as affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income, as defined in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code, or subject to an agreement that provides housing subsidies for affordable housing for persons and families of very low, low, or moderate income, as defined in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code or comparable federal statutes.
(2) Dormitories constructed and maintained in connection with any higher education institution within the state for use and occupancy by students in attendance at the institution.
(3) Housing subject to rent or price control through a public entity’s valid exercise of its police power consistent with Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 1954.50) that restricts annual increases in the rental rate to an amount less than that provided in subdivision (a).
(4) Housing that has been issued a certificate of occupancy within the previous 15 years.
(5) Residential real property that is alienable separate from the title to any other dwelling unit, provided that both of the following apply:
(A) The owner is not any of the following:
(i) A real estate investment trust, as defined in Section 856 of the Internal Revenue Code.
(ii) A corporation.
(iii) A limited liability company in which at least one member is a corporation.
(B) (i) The tenants have been provided written notice that the residential real property is exempt from this section using the following statement:
“This property is not subject to the rent limits imposed by Section 1947.12 of the Civil Code and is not subject to the just cause requirements of Section 1946.2 of the Civil Code. This property meets the requirements of Sections 1947.12 (c)(5) and 1946.2 (e)(7) of the Civil Code and the owner is not any of the following: (1) a real estate investment trust, as defined by Section 856 of the Internal Revenue Code; (2) a corporation; or (3) a limited liability company in which at least one member is a corporation.”
(ii) For a tenancy existing before July 1, 2020, the notice required under clause (i) may, but is not required to, be provided in the rental agreement.
(iii) For a tenancy commenced or renewed on or after July 1, 2020, the notice required under clause (i) must be provided in the rental agreement.
(iv) Addition of a provision containing the notice required under clause (i) to any new or renewed rental agreement or fixed-term lease constitutes a similar provision for the purposes of subparagraph (E) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 1946.2.
(6) A duplex in which the owner occupied one of the units as the owner’s principal place of residence at the beginning of the tenancy, so long as the owner continues in occupancy.
(e) An owner shall provide notice of any increase in the rental rate, pursuant to subdivision (a), to each tenant in accordance with Section 827.
(f) (1) On or before January 1, 2030, the Legislative Analyst’s Office shall report to the Legislature regarding the effectiveness of this section and Section 1947.13. The report shall include, but not be limited to, the impact of the rental rate cap pursuant to subdivision (a) on the housing market within the state.
(2) The report required by paragraph (1) shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code.
(g) For the purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) “Owner” and “residential real property” shall have the same meaning as those terms are defined in Section 1954.51.
(2) “Percentage change in the cost of living” means the percentage change from April 1 of the prior year to April 1 of the current year in the regional Consumer Price Index for the region where the residential real property is located, as published by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. If a regional index is not available, the California Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers for all items, as determined by the Department of Industrial Relations, shall apply.
(3) “Tenancy” means the lawful occupation of residential real property and includes a lease or sublease.
(h) (1) This section shall apply to all rent increases subject to subdivision (a) occurring on or after March 15, 2019. This section shall become operative January 1, 2020.
(2) In the event that an owner has increased the rent by more than the amount permissible under subdivision (a) between March 15, 2019, and January 1, 2020, both of the following shall apply:
(A) The applicable rent on January 1, 2020, shall be the rent as of March 15, 2019, plus the maximum permissible increase under subdivision (a).
(B) An owner shall not be liable to the tenant for any corresponding rent overpayment.
(3) An owner of residential real property subject to subdivision (a) who increased the rental rate on that residential real property on or after March 15, 2019, but prior to January 1, 2020, by an amount less than the rental rate increase permitted by subdivision (a) shall be allowed to increase the rental rate twice, as provided in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a), within 12 months of March 15, 2019, but in no event shall that rental rate increase exceed the maximum rental rate increase permitted by subdivision (a).
(i) Any waiver of the rights under this section shall be void as contrary to public policy.
(j) This section shall remain in effect until January 1, 2030, and as of that date is repealed.
(k) (1) The Legislature finds and declares that the unique circumstances of the current housing crisis require a statewide response to address rent gouging by establishing statewide limitations on gross rental rate increases.
(2) It is the intent of the Legislature that this section should apply only for the limited time needed to address the current statewide housing crisis, as described in paragraph (1). This section is not intended to expand or limit the authority of local governments to establish local policies regulating rents consistent with Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 1954.50), nor is it a statement regarding the appropriate, allowable rental rate increase when a local government adopts a policy regulating rent that is otherwise consistent with Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 1954.50).
(3) Nothing in this section authorizes a local government to establish limitations on any rental rate increases not otherwise permissible under Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 1954.50), or affects the existing authority of a local government to adopt or maintain rent controls or price controls consistent with that chapter.

SEC. 4.

Section 1947.13 is added to the Civil Code, to read:

1947.13.

(a) Notwithstanding Section 1947.12, upon the expiration of rental restrictions, the following shall apply:

(1) The owner of an assisted housing development who demonstrates, under penalty of perjury, compliance with all applicable provisions of Sections 65863.10, 65863.11, and 65863.13 of the Government Code and any other applicable law or regulation intended to promote the preservation of assisted housing, may establish the initial unassisted rental rate for units in the applicable housing development. Any subsequent rent increase in the development shall be subject to Section 1947.12.
(2) The owner of a deed-restricted affordable housing unit or an affordable housing unit subject to a regulatory restriction contained in an agreement with a government agency limiting rental rates that is not within an assisted housing development may establish the initial rental rate for the unit upon the expiration of the restriction. Any subsequent rent increase for the unit shall be subject to Section 1947.12.
(b) For purposes of this section:
(1) “Assisted housing development” has the same meaning as defined in paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 65863.10 of the Government Code.
(2) “Expiration of rental restrictions” has the same meaning as defined in paragraph (5) of subdivision (a) of Section 65863.10 of the Government Code.
(c) This section shall remain in effect until January 1, 2030, and as of that date is repealed.
(d) Any waiver of the rights under this section shall be void as contrary to public policy.

SEC. 5.

No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution because the only costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district will be incurred because this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.

Here Are The Reasons to Appoint A Legal Document Preparer in Sacramento

Stop thinking and contact us. Here we are present to give you the right information about legal document preparation. Don’t you get it? Well, you may worry about your legal situations, but we (LDA PRO LEGAL) cannot ignore your problems. We can solve your problems with some great ideas, and the idea is- if you cannot fill up your legal papers correctly, contact us. We can prepare your legal papers perfectly. We are not the attorney and we not provide legal advice, but we can organize all legal papers completely.

In this blog, we will show some situations and the solution. If you read it to the end, you will gather a huge idea of a legal document preparer in Sacramento.

We allow every LDA PRO LEGAL to prepare legal documents for people and they represent themselves in legal matters. We provide the same job for all clients under the direct supervision of an attorney.

Legal-Document-Preparation

These are the explanations to choose us (Legal document preparer Sacramento)

Before trust us, read the following lines/ reasons, which will help you increase your knowledge.

Reason1-licensed

Don’t appoint anyone who has no license. Before you hire any LDA PRO LEGAL, ask them about a license. If you ask us, we will never mind. We will show our license. Always remember that a licensed company can give you the right solution and proper guidance.

For example, suppose you are going with a child custody process;Here you have to understand some important matters and you have to fill up important legal papers. If you take help from an LDA PRO LEGAL, you will save your time and you will get proper legal papers.

Important thing is that we never discuss matters;We only prepare legal papers carefully.

Reason2-Availability

We are available in all seasons. Yes, we celebrate all occasions, but we are available for the client’s support.

Reason3-appropriate knowledge

Knowledge is an important factor of all. Our all-legal document preparer of Sacramento is knowledgeable and efficient to solve all papers.

For example, suppose you are a tenant and your property-owner does not return your security deposit money, in this case, you can hire a lawyer and LDA PRO LEGAL. As an LDA PRO LEGAL, we can prepare your notice and legal documents.

Reason4-Supportive

If you contact us ‘Legal Document Assistants’ or appoint our experts to make legal papers and files, you will understand our support system and you profile our organization.

Reason5-Experienced

People try to appoint experienced ones. We are experienced firm and our all-legal document preparer hold extreme experience level. If you got confused to fill up the legal papers, we can help you make complete legal papers ready for signature.

Legal-document-preparer

Follow us and spread us

You already entered our website and you know how efficient we are. However, if you want to face us, then hire our staff and suggest your friend to contact us if they need the legal document preparer in Sacramento. To learn more, visit our service page and read other blogs and articles.

Paralegal Services Rocklin

Be acquainted with the different services offered by the paralegals

Paralegals are a specialized legal assistant who can help in a legal case by managing the massive paperwork. They have a vast knowledge of doing this task. Hence, appointing a paralegal is undoubtedly an indisputable way to prepare legal documents. Most of the people in Rocklin prefer to appoint a paralegal in this regard. Do you want to appoint the professional? Then you must contact a trusted paralegal firm for hiring a paralegal. But prior to contact, you must be acquainted with the different paralegal services in Rocklin. Well, this post has brought a detailed study on this topic. So, carry on reading to know about this.

Paralegal Services Rocklin

Take a look at the services that paralegals offer

The different services of the paralegals are summarized below.

  • Process serving: The process servers are usually appointed to deliver the documents to the opponent. Hence, it is very important to prepare the documents first. But it is very difficult for an attorney to spend time preparing the relevant documents. This is where the benefit of appointing a paralegal lies. They will prepare the necessary documents on time. So, appointing a paralegal can help a process server to complete the task timely.
  • Eviction services: If your tenant refuses to vacate your property, you will definitely send a notice. Right? But in this predicament, you will not be in the mental condition to take the responsibility of preparing the necessary documents on your own. That’s why you must appoint a paralegal. You can release your burden by taking this approach. They will present you all the papers within the deadline.
  • Court filing services: This service comes under the paralegal services in Rocklin. Court filing refers to the process of submitting the relevant documents for the legal case. These papers should be submitted in a court within the deadline. In addition, court filing ensures that your case is filed within its statute of limitations. So, if you appoint a paralegal in this regard, it will be easier for you to submit the documents on time.
  • Family law documents: The paralegals will prepare the family law documents regarding divorce, child custody, child support, stipulation agreements, guardianship and so many. If you appoint paralegals in this respect, your attorney will be much benefited. He/she would not have to pay attention to preparing documents. Taking this approach will help an attorney to concentrate on the legal case.
  • Estate planning documents: Estate means all the property that you own. It includes cash, clothes, cars, house, jewelry, land, savings account, etc. And estate planning incorporates plans for transferring the estate after death. The paralegals are well aware of preparing the estate planning documents. They are proficient enough in doing this task. Hence, you can appoint a paralegal for preparing the estate planning documents.
Paralegal Service Provider

Feel free to contact us

You can contact Legal Document Assistants to appoint a paralegal. We have a team of registered and bonded professionals who offer the above-mentioned paralegal services in Rocklin. Our paralegals are also involved in the mobile notary public. So, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Divorce Paralegal Sacramento

Here is everything you need to consider before hiring a divorce paralegal

Hiring an attorney might not be an affordable option for people seeking a divorce. However, in Sacramento, many people still find it to be too appalling to take up the finalization of their divorce through the court practice on their own—without proper guidance or management.

Instead of appointing a divorce attorney on retainer, some couples find it better to hire a divorce paralegal in Sacramento to aid them. These specialists can support you go for the correct plans, and they present several benefits at a lowered charge, contrasted to an attorney.

How do you know if appointing a divorce paralegal could be the right choice for you? To receive a meticulous interpretation of what they can present, scroll through the upcoming passages.

Divorce-processing-Sacramento

Who is a divorce paralegal?

A divorce paralegal is commonly a backup to an attorney. A divorce attorney directly oversees some of them within the same office. Others may practice individually, based on their particular experience, education, or training.

Remember that a paralegal does not have the right or capacity to provide legal counsel throughout the entire procedure. Only attorneys can offer that. Therefore, you might have an attorney on your squad of specialists if you think you require legal consultation. A paralegal also cannot represent you in court if your divorce heads to trial.

The right divorce paralegal should be capable of helping you proofread and develop any significant plans. They have the experience and they are well-proficient in knowing which plans are paramount and where you require filling them, based on local rules and regulations. If you think you may strive in this sector while striving to deal with your divorce on your own, a paralegal may offer the right standard of help for you.

Things to consider regarding hiring a divorce paralegal

Before you hire a divorce paralegal, consider the factors below:

  1. Check their client service experiences, their receptivity to your phone calls and emails, and their responsibility to perceiving the details surrounding your specific condition. You also do not want compromise with the relevance of tidiness in their office and the friendliness of their reception staff and other Associates.
  2. Seek experts who manage an official confirmation from a reputable association. Examples of highly respected programs include those sanctioned by the American Bar Association (ABA) or the National Association of Legal Assistants. They may also hold a valid license or they have the registration within their field, depending on your state’s rules and regulations.
  3. You will want to appoint someone who specializes as a divorce paralegal or in alternative family law matters, instead of someone who has an involvement in a wide range of areas. This tactic ensures that their expertise and training is more sensitively tuned than it might otherwise be.
Divorce-Paralegal-sacramento

We, Legal Document Assistants, are a reliable paralegal firm. Hopefully, this info has helped you understand the significance of hiring a divorce paralegal in Sacramento. Don’t forget to follow the instructions before you hire a divorce paralegal.These will help you find a reliable divorce paralegal who can offer you great guidance at reasonable charges.

Learn How A Process Server Can Help You in A Legal Case

Court cases are truly stressful to handle for an attorney as well as a client. It includes a lot of paperwork. But it becomes a serious matter of concern when it comes to delivering the relevant documents to the opposition party. This is where the benefit of hiring a process server lies. If you are incorporated in a legal case and quite tensed about this matter, you are highly advised to appoint a Process Server from a trusted paralegal firm. They will help you a lot to take forward your legal case in a hassle-free manner by delivering the necessary documents to your opponent. Now, go through the attached passage to know what the process servers actually do and why you should appoint them.

process serving

What the process servers actually do?

A process server is an expert who delivers the relevant documents of a court to your defendant. They will give you full assurance of delivering documents to the opponent by showing evidence. If they are not able to hand the relevant papers to the defendant directly, `they will give it to the management at the defendant’s place of business or another adult person in the opponent’s home.

Now, read the adjoined passage to know why you should appoint a process server.

This is why you must appoint a process server?

Learn the significant reasons why you should appoint a process server in the below-mentioned points.

You can release your burden

Attending a court case is undoubtedly a great deal of stress especially when you have to tackle a ton of paperwork. Delivering the relevant document to the opponent is truly a crucial task in a legal case. It can be a cause of a sleepless night for a client. In this predicament, if you appoint a process server, you could be ensured that there will be a person who will take the gigantic responsibility of giving the necessary documents to the defendant. Hiring a process server can make you feel relaxed in this respect.

The process servers have enough skill and experience

The process servers from a trusted paralegal firm have adequate skill and years of experience of dealing with their clients. With their skill, they can accomplish their task accurately. They are very clear about their boundaries and are well aware of their duties. Moreover, the process servers are acquainted with the various techniques and strategies that can help them to handle the difficult serve.

This is how the process servers can help you to take forward your legal case with ease. On the other hand, if you appoint a local guy to serve the documents, he may supply these within his network. Hence, you are suggested to contact a trusted paralegal firm in order to appoint a registered process server. And you will be offered service from them at an affordable price.

Process Server

Feel free to contact us

You can contact Legal Document Assistants to appoint a process server. We are one of the trusted paralegal firms. Don’t be hesitated to consult with us. We will be with you to the end.

Eviction Help Sacramento

Looking for eviction help in Sacramento- Find your solution here!

Evicting a tenant is truly a time consuming and intimidating process. Even it can be frustrating and stressful for the landlords. If a tenant refuses to vacate the property, the landlords should not tackle this issue on their own. They must take eviction help for getting a permanent solution. Most of the people in Sacramento always prefer to hire the unlawful detainer assistants in this regard. If you are suffering from the same issue, it is highly advisable to contact a reputed paralegal firm to appoint an unlawful detainer assistant for eviction help in Sacramento. The expert will help you a lot and make the entire process easier. However, there are several reasons to evict a tenant. These reasons are given in the attached passage. If you are passing through any of these situations, you must take eviction help.

Eviction-Help

The different reasons to evict a tenant

A landlord can evict a tenant for the following reasons:

  • Lease violation.
  • If the tenant has an unauthorized animal on the premises.
  • If the tenant allows someone else in the property without your permission.
  • If the tenant is involved in any illegal activities.
  • Property damage and so many.

If you are suffering from any of these issues, you should immediately hire an unlawful detainer assistant to receive eviction help in Sacramento. Now, go through the rest of this post to know how you will be benefitted by taking this approach.

How an unlawful detainer assistant can help you in the eviction process?

Read the below-mentioned points attentively and you will easily understand why you are suggested to contact a paralegal firm in this respect.

The experts have comprehensive knowledge about the eviction process

All the registered and bonded unlawful detainer assistants have adequate knowledge and years of experience in the eviction process. They are well aware of each a necessary step that must be carried out to evict a tenant. If you deliver this gigantic responsibility to them, you will be assured that your problem is going to be resolved quickly.

They prepare the eviction notice fast

If your problem is critical, it is desirable to have a professional prepare and serve the eviction notice as early as possible. Here, you can get this advantage by appointing an unlawful detainer assistant. They can prepare the eviction notice within a short time. Even, they can also serve the notice to your tenant on the same day.

Release your stress

This is truly a big headache for the landlords if their tenants refuse to vacate their property. So, why will you take this burden in spite of having the help of an unlawful detainer assistant? If you appoint the professional, you wouldn’t need to bring your time out from your hectic schedule to serve the eviction notice to your tenant. They will take all the responsibility from the beginning and provide you assistance until or unless you get success.

Eviction-Help-Sacramento

Consider hiring us

You can contact Legal Document Assistants, a renowned paralegal firm. Our experts are always ready for you to give eviction help in Sacramento. Feel free to contact us to take our assistance.